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Emerging Infectious Diseases

Given the global, interconnected world, emerging infectious diseases can spread very quickly around the world. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), infectious disease whose incidence in humans has increased in the past 2 decades or threatens to increase in the near future have been defined as "emerging." These diseases, which respect no national boundaries, include

  • New infections resulting from changes or evolution of existing organisms
  • Known infections spreading to new geographic areas or populations
  • Previously unrecognized infections appearing in areas undergoing ecologic transformation
  • Old infections reemerging as a result of antimicrobial resistance in known agents or breakdowns in public health measures.

Given the challenges when approaching emerging infectious diseases, the Global Business Group on Health connects members with available resources and outside experts (e.g., CDC) as well as benchmarking opportunities with other employers.

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Featured Resources

Measles: Outbreaks Up, Vaccinations Down. What Employers Can Do Measles: Outbreaks Up, Vaccinations Down. What Employers Can Do
This deck highlights the consequences of declining rates of measles immunization in several regions around the world. It offers ideas for employers to educate and inform their workforce of the value of vaccines as well as ensure that employees have access to appropriate immunizations and preventive services.

Employer Resources - Zika Virus Employer Resources - Zika Virus
Outlines assembled recommendations about the potential legal obligations and responsibilities of U.S. employers as relates to the Zika virus outbreak.

The Next Global Pandemic: What Employers Need to Know The Next Global Pandemic: What Employers Need to Know
This slide deck lists the World Health Organization's list of emerging pathogens likely to cause severe outbreaks in the near future, and highlights actions that employers can take to address the needs of their global workforce both prior to and during a disease epidemic.

 

 

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